Tag Archives: music

The Juxtaposition of Lana Del Rey

This is how I work: when it’s sunny and warm outside, I’m happy.  When it’s cold and snowing, I’m sad.  Pretty basic.  I don’t care about the research I’ve read at school, the weather affects my mood, because I hate Massachusetts Weather.

It’s currently the most depressing time of the year for me here in arctic: winter.  The past two months literally have had below freezing temperatures.  It’s just been so dark and cold, and so much snow.  Sad face.

Given the fact that I listen to music mostly based on my mood, and that I’ve been so deflated because of this weather, you’d think I’d listen to music from the ever so effervescent Lana Del Rey (sarcasm), especially her album Born to Die.  But the thing is, that’s really a summertime album for me.

I’m not kidding.  Last summer, one of the albums I had on repeat was Born to Die, and had her songs “Born to Die,” “Video Games,” and “Summertime Sadness” (both the standard and Cedric Gervais Remix (which just won a Grammy)) on repeat on my iPod, especially when I was out biking in the beautiful sunshine.  Today, while at work shelving books, I realized I hadn’t listen to the stunning Lana Del Rey’s music in months, so I decided to dedicate an hour to Born to Die.  It didn’t last; the album kept reminding me of summer and I thought “huh, this is a summer album.”

If you’ve heard the album or any of those songs, they’re not upbeat songs; they’re not songs that would provide you much motivation while exercising or songs that would cheer you up.  So why are these slow, somewhat melodramatic, and rather ethereal songs more compatible for my summer?

The somewhat magical thing about Lana Del Rey’s music is that while it’s depressing-sounding, it does not make the listener depressed.  In a weird way, her musical content is rather bold in that she sticks to themes and strong opinions of heartbreak that others stray from; I doubt anyone would tell their boyfriend, even in song form, that they were “born to die,” or that, rather poignantly, “I think I’ll miss you forever/ Like the stars miss the sun in the morning sky.”  From her lyrics and her music, Lana Del Rey’s listeners pick up her darker emotions and either relate to them or simply understand them.  Take her summer hit, “Summertime Sadness,” the lyrics, on the surface, would appear rather optimistic for Del Rey.  With such lines like “I just wanted you to know/That, baby, you’re the best” and “Oh, my God, I feel it in the air/ Telephone wires above are sizzling like a snare/ Honey, I’m on fire, I feel it everywhere/Nothing scares me anymore,” one would expect this love song to be about the height of romance with no depressing undertones.  But when you add swirling strings and ambient tones to Del Rey’s crooning, you get a rather depressing song about heartbreak.  While the song truly is about a breakup in that Del Rey is listing out all the positive/wonderful things about her relationship that she’ll miss like we miss the summer during winter, the production of the song could have been manipulated to create a more positive experience for listeners.  Take Colbie Caillat’s song “Realize” for example.  The song, like all of Caillat’s signature songs, sounds positive and happy like the sun-kissed home she’s from (she’s from California/Malibu/Hawaii type place).  Her vocal performance and the acoustic nature of the song leaves you smiling, wanting to lay out in the sun with your significant other.  But, upon closer examination of the lyrics, it’s rather a heartbreaking story about unrequited love, especially emphasized with lyrics like “If you just realize what I just realized/ Then we’d be perfect for each other/ And we’ll never find another,” and “It’s not the same/ No, it’s never the same/ If you don’t feel it too.” This is a case where the production/performance of the song changes the scope of the song to be more positive for the audience.  Lana Del Rey, however, does the opposite in that she purposely keeps her music in Born to Die on the negative side to emphasize her misfortunes.

I honestly don’t know why I associate Lana Del Rey’s music with the summer.  I do feel like some music is seasonal, and logic and my past experience would sort Lana Del Rey as a winter’s artist, songs not to be listened to during the upbeat summer.  But that’s not the case.  Perhaps it’s just me; perhaps LDR should be listened year round.  Let me know with poll below!

 

 

Your Snow Shoveling Playlist

With today’s blizzard-like snow here in the arctic, here’s my snow shoveling playlist.  It helps plow through the snow and stay positive that spring is almost here (hopefully):

  1. Closer” – Tegan & Sara
  2. Where Is My Mind?” – Pixies
  3. 10538 Overture” – Electric Light Orchestra
  4. Just Dance” – Lady Gaga
  5. Bad Romance [the Skrillex Remix]” – Lady Gaga
  6. “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together  – Taylor Swift
  7. The Monster [feat. Rihanna]” – Eminem
  8. Viva la Vida” – Coldplay
  9. Bass Down Low” – Dev
  10. My Songs Know What You Did in the Dark (Light Em Up)” – Fall Out Boy

 

“White Lies” by Stacy Clark – #PhillipsSongOfTheDay

I have this professor who prides himself on being a musician as well as being a business professor.  Overall he’s a pretty cool guy and great teacher (this is the second class I’m taking with him).  He usually gives us these class activities to do at the beginning of class to use during our discussion, and he will play a random Pandora station to create a “mood.”  Today, a Lady Gaga song came on, and he shook his head and made a crack about “music today.”  Basically, in his opinion (and other kids in the class, who I’m pretty sure where just sucking up to him), music today is a bunch of crap.
I don’t like when people are negative or cut down music without giving it a chance.  I had a friend in high school who literally would hate any music/song that was played on the radio because it was “mainstream.”  He was the kind of guy that would only listen to obscure jazz or blues songs.  I recommended him to listen to Adele’s album 19 because it features that jazzy-blusy sounds he enjoyed.  Just as I did so, Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep” blew up on the radio, and he refused to listen to her songs.  Like, I don’t get that at all.  I think the level of musicality or whether a song is “good” or not should not be established by who listens to it.  You just need to sit back, relax, and just listen.

Anyway, because my professor made this crack about Lady Gaga and the rest of today’s terrible music, I decided to name a Lady Gaga song #PhillipsSongOfTheDay.  I was going to pick “Just Dance” because I was listening it as I was shoveling snow in this lovely weather we’re having (by the way, I pretty much hate the cold, snow, and will probably blog about that…I’ve written songs about my hatred of winter here in the arctic).  However, I started to listen to Stacy Clark’s song “White Lies” while writing this post, and well, that kind of got stuck in my head/started playing on repeat, and it reminded how much I’m blown away but that song.

There’s something about this song that should not work, like you hear it and think “that’s not a radio single,” which I guess it’s not considering I don’t think it got radio traction (at least, I haven’t heard it on the radio), but the song really works.  I’m not saying that for it to be good it needs to be on the radio, I’m not a hypocrite, it’s just the song has a weird rhythm/beat to it…a weird rhythm/beat I enjoy.  The lyric that stands out for me is “Do you think I’m a fool? Shame on you and shame on me twice, for trusting, trusting you.”

If you haven’t heard this song, you need to.  It’s great.

“The Love Club” by Lorde

The Love Club” by Lorde is #PhillipsSongOfTheDay 

It’s been on repeat for the past hour.  Why?  Because Lorde is an incredible musician/artist, and I’ve been kind of obsessed with her music for the past month.  My sister and I were going to splurge and see her in concert, even though I’m a #brokecollegestudent, but we couldn’t get tickets!  It sold out too fast!

Seriously, though, “The Love Club” has this incredible pulsating/swelling background vocals (I don’t really know how to explain it…you just got to listen to it) that really makes the song.  The producer, I’m assuming Joel Little (he produced/co-produced all or Lorde’s music…I believe), did this thing where he added a crescendo to the fourth beat (I think) when Lorde’s background vocal goes up that makes the note change stand out….pure genius.  This will make more sense if you just listen to the song:

I also want to commend Lorde for the way she sings the chorus, especially the line “Be a part of the love club;” her phrasing is perfect.  The way a person sings just one word really can change my opinion of a song (e.g. the way Lorde sings the word “ruins” in her song “Team” is perfection…part of the reason it’s one of my favorite songs…not kidding).

I read an interpretation of “The Love Club” that said the song is about how if you want to be cool and to be “in the club,” by society’s/the media’s standards, you have to be dating someone or be in a relationship.  Basically, this is Lorde being her usual self of denouncing the media for telling people, particularly youths, how to live their lives.  I kind of admire that about Lorde and her music.  I generally don’t like songs that preach to people and tell people how to run their lives, but I think Lorde knows how to straddle that line.  Her songs stop right before telling people how they should live; she’s telling us how she chooses to live.  I find “The Love Club” to be refreshing, and, at this moment, relatable.